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Seems weird that no one has mentioned Orbeez to me before

Life is a series of crushing disappointments, and this is no exception: I have recently learned that Orbeez, which are tiny, absorbent polymer balls that expand to 100 times their original size when wet, and which YouTube personalities love to purchase by the millions and pour into pools, have existed for years.

And none of you posers thought to tell me!

Check this out. Here’s a guy putting 25 million Orbeez in a swimming pool, where they become large and jelly-like, and jumping in to see if he’ll float. This video has everything I like: yelling, science, and a vague connection to the Salem Witch Trials.

And no one was like, “Hey, cool vid! I’m going to pass this one on to Chloe?” Sheesh.

Here’s some dude in a muscle tank dipping several pool skimmers full of dry Orbeez into a pool, watching the Orbeez expand, putting the expanded Orbeez in a trash can, putting his cute dog in that same trash can and uttering the phrase “dog spa” (my favorite phrase), then dumping those Orbeez one million of them into his girlfriend’s car.

This video was published in September 2016. And no one wanted to copy-paste the link (a maximum of five clicks) and send it to my Gmail or whatever? I’m literally always checking my Gmail, and I have two accounts! Oh my god!

Next, please enjoy a video of the world record for Biggest Orbeez Waterfall. As the video description says, the clip features “MILLIONS of Orbeez dropped by a giant CRANE into a big POOL.”

And you’re telling me that MILLIONS of Orbeez didn’t even convince you to send this to me? Or just mention it in passing? Come on.

And here’s somebody putting Orbeez in a meat grinder. Look at the disgusting goop that comes out. It’s like … I could have watched this in February four calendar months ago.

Christ. I have never had any true friends. Whatever. Have a good weekend.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/18/orbeez-youtube-challenge/

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What do we call people who use fidget spinners?

Image: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Well, friends, the fidget spinner craze keeps on spinning. And as more and more of my pals, enemies, and acquaintances acquire these little gadgets, there’s a big question that I and perhaps only I want to answer.

What’s a good name for someone who uses a fidget spinner?

Okay, hear me out. Someone who yo-yos is called a yo-yoer, right? And, as Chance the Rapper tells us, someone who plays with a hacky sack is called a hacky sacker.

But this formula doesn’t quite work with fidget spinners. A fidget spinner-er? It just doesn’t roll off the tongue the way it should.

So here are some other (very, very serious) ideas.

Fidgeters

Pros: Some people are already using this, I guess?

Cons: Already a word.

Spidgeters

Pros: Not already a word. Does not yield even a single Google result.

Cons: Sounds like a terrifying inhalant.

Spinners squared

Pros: It makes logical sense: people who spin fidget spinners are fidget spinner spinners, right? Spinners squared? Get it?

Cons: Deeply boring.

Spinneroonis

Pros: Turn to your left and say this to the first person you see: “I’m a spinnerooni!” Pretty fun.

Cons: You did not actually do the above, and neither will anyone else.

Masters of Spin

Pros: Could be a middle-of-the-road television show starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan.

Cons: This is a better name for a Kellyanne Conway-themed cabaret show than someone who uses a fidget spinner.

Fidgetbois

Pros: Always fun to spell “boi” with an I; am I right, boiz?

Cons: Not necessarily inclusive of non-male fidget spinner enthusiasts.

Cool folks

Pros: Fidget spinners are cool and so are the people who use them. This name pretty much says it all!

Cons: This is what they also used to call people who played Pokmon Go. :(

Please get back to me with your favorite. We simply must get this sorted out.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/11/fidget-spinner-person-name/

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Experts poke holes in marketing claims about fidget spinners


Teachers' worst nightmare.
Image: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fidget spinners are a fun, relaxing fount of mindless entertainment. But are they really more than a cheap toy?

Some experts say no. Despite marketing claims, there’s no research that shows the wildly popular spinners are therapeutic tools for people with anxiety, autism, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

“I know there’s lots of similar toys … and there’s basically no scientific evidence that those things work across the board,” Scott Kollins, a clinical psychologist and professor at Duke University, told NPR on Sunday.

That doesn’t mean the three-pronged plastic phenomena don’t provide any real benefits, or that parents and educators are wrong when they say it helps some children focus in the classroom. But retailers may be stretching the truth when they label these devices as treatments for fidgety behavior, minuscule attention spans, or discomfort in a classroom setting.

You sure about that, Mr. Fidget Spinner Maker?

“It’s important for parents and teachers who work with kids who have ADHD to know that there are very well studied and documented treatments that work, and that they’re out there, so there’s not really quick and easy fixes like buying a toy,” Kollins told NPR.

About 11 percent of U.S. children between the ages of 4 and 17 or 6.4 million kids have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Their parents often search for help beyond the typical medication, which might make them more vulnerable to marketing efforts that falsely lump these toys in the category of evaluated, proven solutions that help students focus and learn.

Another expert had a similarly skeptical view of fidget spinners.

“Using a spinner-like gadget is more likely to serve as a distraction than a benefit for individuals with ADHD,” Mark Rapport, a clinical psychologist at the University of Central Florida who has studied the benefits of movement on attention in people with ADHD, told LiveScience earlier this month.

Still, parents and some developmental specialists have defended fidget spinners, even as teachers and schools banned them from the classroom for being too disruptive. Proponents argue that, under the right circumstances, spinners and devices like them can soothe an anxious student or calm a hyperactive mind.

Hmm, maybe not.

“These little gadgets should be called fidget tools, not toys, and they can be part of a successful strategy for managing fidgety behavior if they are introduced as a normal part of the classroom culture,” Claire Heffron, a pediatric occupational therapist in Cleveland, recently told the Washington Post.

A 2015 study found that students with ADHD performed better on a computerized attention test the more intensely they fidgeted. Children without ADHD, meanwhile, did not improve their test score with fidgeting.

But Julie Schweitzer, the study’s author and a clinical psychologist at the University of California at Davis, said it’s too early to know whether fidget spinners could deliver similar results.

“We need to study them to find if they make a difference and for whom,” Schweitzer told the Post.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/05/14/fidget-spinners-adhd-experts/

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Sad Stuffed Animals That We Made To Educate Kids About Ocean Pollution

Recently we worked with the NGO Sea Shepherd to create a set of educational toys.

On the outside they look like regular toys but we stuffed them with plastic items that animals tend to eat in the nature.

We made them with the help of Andrea Vida (a very talented independent designer from Hungary) and early childhood teachers. All of them are hand-sewn using responsible materials.

Then we contacted different early childhood organizations to implement these toys in their educational program.

Special thanks to Xuan Pham, Sonali Ranjit and Andrea Vida.

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/we-made-cute-plushies-to-educate-kids-about-ocean-pollution/