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After making $3.5 million on Indiegogo, this palm-sized micro drone can be yours

Image: extreme toys

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While smartphone-based VR is still in the early stages, there are some drones that prove the technology is coming along quicker than we think.

Smart, fast, and able to fit in the palms of your hands, the Micro Drone 3.0 is what weve all been waiting for.

With the power to stream 720p HD video directly to your device, you get a first-person view of the drones flight path as it cruises along at speeds up to 45 mph.

This kit comes with everything you need to fly, including a cardboard headset and inverted blades for belly-up orientation. For more tactile control than a capacitive touch screen, there’s also a 2.4 GHz handset that can extend your flight range up to 500 feet.

The Micro Drone 3.0 is also completely customizable with maneuverability settings that can be tweaked with the Extreme Flyers free phone app plus, its constructed from 3D printable modular components, allowing for some truly unique body shapes.

Usually $215, you can grab the Micro Drone 3.0 Combo Pack from our store for just $145.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/01/micro-drone-with-live-video-feed/

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Foursquare, a SXSW darling, brought the most fun to SXSW 2017

Image: justin breton of foursquare

SXSW is 10 days of fun. Many of colleagues (I see you Brett Williams) teased me (on Slack) for having a “great time with all the work down there.”

But, hey, it’s actually work. Attending panel after panel, speaking on your own panels, BBQ after BBQ, happy hour after happy hour isn’t easy no matter how fun it looks from everyone’s Snapchat (or Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp, Facebook) Stories.

When I came back, and even during the whole ordeal, I found my favorite part to be the 45 minutes that I spent away from all the hullabaloo. It was the cycling class I participated with Foursquare and CYC on Monday, the midway point in my SXSW journey.

The invitation wasn’t extended lightly. Mine arrived in my inbox after I expressed my sadness (on Twitter) over Spotify not throwing their own cycling event, as they did in the year prior with SoulCycle. In 2016, I legit “Turned Up On A Tuesday” with ILoveMakonnen.

This year, Spotify didn’t have their official House. But, Foursquare, the app that gained fame in SXSW 2009, was there to provide me with a break from all the action and it was there that I was reminded the beauty of conferences like SXSW.

LOLO also performed during the first ride and then joined on her own bike.

Image: Sydney Torabi from Spinsyddy

“I came to South By for the first time last year. I remember we were bouncing from party to party, eating, drinking, but this is one thing that we missed the opportunity to take a step back from the hectic-ness of South By and take a break,” Justin Breton, Foursquare’s head of marketing partnerships, tells me in the hallway of the Westin.

This was the second of two cycling classes Foursquare held. The first was inside a donut shop. This time, we were on the recently remodeled rooftop of the Westin.

For me, similar to Breton, it provided an escape and a reminder that physical fitness is important.

For Foursquare, the events were a pretty big deal for its business.

“This is the first year that were doing something [on our own.] While its small scale, it allows us to be a part of the South By conversation. We wanted to keep it intimate,” Breton said.

Foursquare wasn’t doing anything flashy, however. “The conversation has evolved so much. It launched here at South By. It was a consumer app. It was a darling of South By. Now, we’re a very established company with a suite of business products,” Breton said. “I’m proud to be a part of a company thats forward thinking, not just focusing on one area of the business.”

Yes, Foursquare was a South By darling just like Twitter, Highlight and Meerkat. But we haven’t had one of those since 2015 with Meerkat. Two SXSW without a darling what happened? Is the tech world just no longer creative enough?

Image: Sydney Torabi from Spinsyddy

“I dont know. I was here last year, and it was the same situation. We didnt feel like we walked away with a new product,” Breton said. “I saw a lot of VR last year and saw a lot this year … Thats evolved.”

Breton also said he has seen the growth of tech companies embracing location (as in, what Foursquare has to offer businesses). Some of the tech giants, including Twitter and Snapchat, use that data to power their own features.

“I think location data is truly becoming more important,” Breton said. “We just launched our SDK. We’re allowing various brands and apps to use the magic. For a brand to be able to understand that someone goes to the movie theater four times a month, I think that’s something that’s becoming more a part of the conversation.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/03/26/sxsw-2017-best-part/

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Could this be Asia’s answer to the Amazon Echo?


Alexa, meet Clova
Image: Jeff Chiu/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Amazon’s Alexa may be up against big competition.

South Korean internet giant Naver, which runs Line, Japan’s biggest messaging app, unveiled on Wednesday its own AI virtual assistant.

The new assistant is called Clova, and will be entirely voice-based. It’ll be available as a smartphone app as well as a hardware speaker called Wave, similar to Amazon Echo and Google Home.

Clova is scheduled to be available in Japan and South Korea between April and June this year.

Naver is also tying up with huge conglomerates Sony in Japan and LG Electronics in South Korea, to get the Clova into toys and home appliances down the road.

Clova will address Asia’s high-tech market that’s been sorely underserved.

Clova will be able to respond to users’ questions, as well as provide information on various topics, from the weather to the news.

The offering will address a high-tech market in Asia that until now has been sorely underserved.

“We are aiming to make Clova Asia’s leading cloud AI platform,” Line CEO Takeshi Idezawa said during the Mobile World Congress show.

Line has 217 million monthly users, with a large majority of them based in Asian countries like Japan, Taiwan and Thailand.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/03/02/japan-clova-ai-assistant/