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Pixar writer says that viral ‘Toy Story’ narrative is ‘fake news’

Though everyone loves a clever Pixar theory, one of the production company’s most prominent writers and directors is setting the story straight on a viral interview that claims to explain a major Toy Story mystery.

A wildly depressing story about Andy’s father circulated the internet on Saturday, stemming from a single interview in which a friend of a late Pixar writer shared what he says is the truth about this mysterious plot point.

Though Andy’s father’s absence from the films has long been the subject of fan speculation, this interview claims to offer the true story, recounted by the friend of someone who worked on the film.

Later, Pixar writer and animator Andrew Stanton stepped in to call bull:

“Complete and utter fake news,” Stanton tweeted. “Everyone go back to your homes. Nothing to see here, folks. #Iwasthere”.

A Pixar vet, Stanton served as a writer on Toy Story and its subsequent sequels. Other writing and directing credits include A Bug’s Life, WALL-E, Finding Nemo and Finding Dory.

The viral origin story comes courtesy of a YouTube toy reviewer named Mike Mozart who says he became friends with late Pixar writer Joe Ranft years before his death in 2005. In an interview with YouTube channel Super Carlin Brothers shared on June 22, Mozart relayed a conversation he says the pair had regarding the absence of Andy’s father.

The story tells a depressing tale of Andy Sr.’s childhood struggle with polio and the three toys he managed to save Woody, Slinky Dog, and Mr. Potato Head before the rest of his belongings were incinerated.

Years later, moments before his death, he’d call Andy Jr. to him and present him with a key to a trunk in their attic. Andy Sr. tells him to go upstairs and retrieve the trunk, but by the time Andy Jr. returns, his dad has passed away. A few days later, Andy Jr. finally opens his father’s trunk and finds the three toys.

While there are certain details from the film that support Mozart’s story, Stanton’s rebuttal suggests it might be best to label this story a compelling theory until further notice.

But for whatever it’s worth, Mozart stands by his interview:

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/25/toy-story-andy-father-viral-story/

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Seems weird that no one has mentioned Orbeez to me before

Life is a series of crushing disappointments, and this is no exception: I have recently learned that Orbeez, which are tiny, absorbent polymer balls that expand to 100 times their original size when wet, and which YouTube personalities love to purchase by the millions and pour into pools, have existed for years.

And none of you posers thought to tell me!

Check this out. Here’s a guy putting 25 million Orbeez in a swimming pool, where they become large and jelly-like, and jumping in to see if he’ll float. This video has everything I like: yelling, science, and a vague connection to the Salem Witch Trials.

And no one was like, “Hey, cool vid! I’m going to pass this one on to Chloe?” Sheesh.

Here’s some dude in a muscle tank dipping several pool skimmers full of dry Orbeez into a pool, watching the Orbeez expand, putting the expanded Orbeez in a trash can, putting his cute dog in that same trash can and uttering the phrase “dog spa” (my favorite phrase), then dumping those Orbeez one million of them into his girlfriend’s car.

This video was published in September 2016. And no one wanted to copy-paste the link (a maximum of five clicks) and send it to my Gmail or whatever? I’m literally always checking my Gmail, and I have two accounts! Oh my god!

Next, please enjoy a video of the world record for Biggest Orbeez Waterfall. As the video description says, the clip features “MILLIONS of Orbeez dropped by a giant CRANE into a big POOL.”

And you’re telling me that MILLIONS of Orbeez didn’t even convince you to send this to me? Or just mention it in passing? Come on.

And here’s somebody putting Orbeez in a meat grinder. Look at the disgusting goop that comes out. It’s like … I could have watched this in February four calendar months ago.

Christ. I have never had any true friends. Whatever. Have a good weekend.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/18/orbeez-youtube-challenge/

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What do we call people who use fidget spinners?

Image: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Well, friends, the fidget spinner craze keeps on spinning. And as more and more of my pals, enemies, and acquaintances acquire these little gadgets, there’s a big question that I and perhaps only I want to answer.

What’s a good name for someone who uses a fidget spinner?

Okay, hear me out. Someone who yo-yos is called a yo-yoer, right? And, as Chance the Rapper tells us, someone who plays with a hacky sack is called a hacky sacker.

But this formula doesn’t quite work with fidget spinners. A fidget spinner-er? It just doesn’t roll off the tongue the way it should.

So here are some other (very, very serious) ideas.

Fidgeters

Pros: Some people are already using this, I guess?

Cons: Already a word.

Spidgeters

Pros: Not already a word. Does not yield even a single Google result.

Cons: Sounds like a terrifying inhalant.

Spinners squared

Pros: It makes logical sense: people who spin fidget spinners are fidget spinner spinners, right? Spinners squared? Get it?

Cons: Deeply boring.

Spinneroonis

Pros: Turn to your left and say this to the first person you see: “I’m a spinnerooni!” Pretty fun.

Cons: You did not actually do the above, and neither will anyone else.

Masters of Spin

Pros: Could be a middle-of-the-road television show starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan.

Cons: This is a better name for a Kellyanne Conway-themed cabaret show than someone who uses a fidget spinner.

Fidgetbois

Pros: Always fun to spell “boi” with an I; am I right, boiz?

Cons: Not necessarily inclusive of non-male fidget spinner enthusiasts.

Cool folks

Pros: Fidget spinners are cool and so are the people who use them. This name pretty much says it all!

Cons: This is what they also used to call people who played Pokmon Go. :(

Please get back to me with your favorite. We simply must get this sorted out.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/11/fidget-spinner-person-name/

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Remember when Republicans wanted to investigate the Clintons’ pet cat?

Image: NIGHSWANDER/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Republicans seem a bit investigation-shy these days, don’t they? Well, as you might remember from election season, that wasn’t always the case. During Bill Clinton’s administration, House Republicans even called for an inquiry into Socks, the First Cat.

Socks was a fairly normal cat, and by most accounts, he seemed to be a good and cute boy. Adopted by Chelsea Clinton as a lost kitten, he enjoyed the things that most cats do: catnip (which press photographers used to lure him closer on the White House lawn), skulking around the grounds, and loathing his canine counterpart, Buddy the dog.

So what was Socks’s crime? For Indiana GOP representative Dan Burton, Socks himself wasn’t the issue. The problem was that constituents liked Socks so much, in fact, that they were sending him mail. Of course, since most of the letter writers were children, the White House would respond from Socks.

And Burton wanted to know why taxpayers were fronting Socks’s postage.

A criminal mastermind.

Image: WILFREDO LEE/AP/REX/Shutterstock

The Chicago Tribune reported on Burton’s “concern” in 1995. (If you’d like a quick character summary on Burton, he stopped using the House gym after Rep. Barney Frank came out as gay in 1987.)

Here’s an excerpt from the letter he sent to the Clintons:

As a member of the new Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, I would like to inquire what the standard practice is for the White House to respond to mail directed to ‘Socks,’ your cat. How many of these inquiries were responded to over the past two years? Who pays for the postage? If it comes out of the White House mail budget, why are the taxpayers being made to pay for your feline’s fan club?

Seems like a lot!

Burton also suggested that the Clintons follow the precedent of Barbara Bush, who wrote a White House book from the perspective of her dog Millie, then donated proceeds to pay for the cost of Millie’s personal correspondence.

Hillary Clinton did, in fact, compile a book of letters written to Socks and Buddy in 1998. However, proceeds from Dear Socks, Dear Buddy were donated to the National Park Foundation.

In the end, of course, nothing came of Burton’s inquiry. A completely unaware Socks got off scot-free and a lot of delighted kids received taxpayer-funded letters from their favorite cat.

Image: Amazon

Incidentally, an Arizona newspaper study ranked Burton the fifth-biggest user of free Congressional mail in 2007, which many considered to be abusing the privilege.

As far as we know, Socks the cat who was enjoying an idyllic Chesapeake Bay retirement at the time did not inquire into Burton’s $190,000 expenses.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/04/socks-the-cat-gop-investigation/